Fire and meat: why we're so hot for the barbecue

From bush fires to kettle grills

It must have been something like this: almost 2 million years ago, the predecessors of Homo sapiens roamed the savannah. Lured by that strangely seductive scent emitted by the burnt antelope in the remains of the bushfire, they cautiously approach. One very brave specimen of Homo habilis (or Homo erectus, science is not quite sure) tastes a piece of the still hot meat. And lo and behold: it tastes good, is wonderfully easy to chew and digest. From here, it's only a short (mental) leap to consciously "roasting meat on a spit over a fire" and it's strange that we can't stand at the grill long and often enough these days. After all, it was the savings in time and kinetic energy that made grilled food an evolutionary advantage. Let's make it short: In the end, the Americans were to blame for the general enthusiasm for barbecues that spilled over into Europe in the 1950s. Not entirely uninvolved in this was the triumph of the kettle grill. We'll leave aside the fact that barbecues were also used in ancient Egypt and by other cultures. After all, we still want to tell you why a barbecue tastes particularly good under the sky of the Alpe di Siusi.


Hephaestus has two South Tyrolean sons

Wait a minute, we'll fill in any gaps in your education: Hephaistos is the Greek god of fire, forges and volcanoes. The fact that he was the son of Zeus and Hera and was supposedly thrown off Mount Olympus because of a crooked leg is only mentioned in passing. We believe that he lives on - at least in spirit - with us on the Ritten. Only nine point five kilometres from the Arvina as the crow flies, the Mair brothers have particularly hot irons in the fire. Christian and Andreas are blacksmiths and locksmiths and have invented something that is extremely beautiful AND extremely useful: Their Multifire fire bowl grill. This well thought-out construction regularly causes many an "Ahhh" and "Ohhh" at our barbecue evenings. We don't want to do any surreptitious advertising here, but simply say it straight out: buy one of these! We are ardent fans. Our Multifire is not only used on balmy summer nights in Siusi, but also in the bitter cold of winter. We use it to brew mulled wine and roast chestnuts. We know it's a bit mean to make your mouth water here. But why don't you come back to Arvina and we'll throw something good on the grill for you?

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